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Joshua

JOSHUA

THE HISTORICAL BOOKS

We have completed our study of the Pentateuch, the first five books of the Old Testament. This brings us to the second major division among the Old Testament books. We will be studying now the 12 books of HISTORY. The 12 books that belong to this division are Joshua, Judges, Ruth, 1 and 2 Samuel, 1 and 2 Kings, 1 and 2 Chronicles, Ezra, Nehemiah, and Esther. When we study these 12 books we are covering a period of about 1,000 years in the history of God’s chosen people.

BASIC TIME LINE

Memorize this “time line” and be able to reconstruct it. It will help you to remember better Old Testament events and people and put them in their proper order. The dates that are given are rounded off for easy memory. They are only approximate dates.

Abraham – 2,000 B.C.
Moses – 1,500 B.C.
The Exodus – 1,450 B.C.
Joshua – 1,400 B.C.
The Judges – 1,350 B.C.
Saul – 1,050 B.C.
David – 1,000 B.C.

THE BOOK OF JOSHUA – GENERAL FACTS

The Book of Joshua records the history of Israel from the death of Moses through the conquest of the Promised Land of Canaan. We do not know who the author of the book is. It seems that the author must have been an eyewitness of the events he records. In 5:1 when the author speaks of Israel crossing the Jordan River, he speaks as though he is one of the people who made the crossing. He says “WE had crossed over.” It does not seem that Joshua was the author, since the book tells of his death and records events that happened after his time. The Book of Joshua received its name from the fact that Joshua is the principal character of the book. Joshua was born in Egypt and became Moses’ “right-hand man” during the exodus and the wilderness wanderings. He was an excellent military commander. He and Caleb were among the 12 spies sent to explore Canaan, as we read in Numbers. Those two men were the only ones allowed to survive the 40 years of wandering in the wilderness and to enter the Promised Land. After the death of Moses, the leadership was passed over to Joshua. Deuteronomy 34:9 says: “Now Joshua son of Nun was filled with the spirit of wisdom because Moses had laid his hands on him. So the Israelites listened to him and did what the Lord had commanded Moses.” The name “Joshua” means “the Lord is salvation.” The Greek form of the name Joshua is “Jesus.” Joshua and Jesus are therefore identical names, the first being Hebrew and the second Greek.

THE PURPOSE OF THE BOOK

The purpose of the Book of Joshua is to show that God was indeed faithful to His promise to Abraham. God had promised that the Land of Canaan would be given to Abraham and his offspring. (See Genesis 12:1-3 and Genesis 23:15.) Connected with this promise of the land was the idea that the Savior would come from the offspring of Abraham in the land of promise. The book of Joshua records for all time that God kept His promise. The Promised Land was given to the offspring of Abraham through the conquests of God’s leader, Joshua. About 1,400 years later, the Savior would be born there.

THEME AND GENERAL OUTLINE OF JOSHUA

The theme of the book is “ISRAEL’S CONQUEST OF THE PROMISED LAND UNDER JOSHUA.” The book is logically divided into two main parts:

  1. The Conquest of the Land (1-12)
  2. The Distribution of the Land (13-24)

A BRIEF SURVEY OF PART 1: “The Conquest of the Land” (1-12)

In chapter 1 God encourages Joshua to be strong and courageous in his work of conquering the Promised Land. Chapter 2 tells how spies were sent into the city of Jericho and were hidden by the woman Rahab. Chapter 3 records the miraculous crossing of the River Jordan, they were able to pass through the river on dry land. Chapter 4 relates the story of the piling up of memorial stones at Gilgal to remind the Israelites how the Lord had dried up the Jordan to allow them to cross over. Chapter 5 tells of the circumcision of all the male Israelites, since for the 40 years of wandering there had been no circumcision. Chapter 6 tells of the destruction of the city of Jericho by the Israelites. Chapter 7 relates the sin of Achan. Achan had kept for himself some of the booty from Jericho. The Lord had strictly forbidden this, and Achan was stoned for his disobedience. Chapter 8 tells of the conquering of the city of Ai and the renewal of the covenant at Mount Ebal. The people fulfilled on Mount Gerezim and Mount Ebal what God had commanded in Deut. 27. Chapter 9 records the deception of the Gibeonites against the Israelites to keep them from being destroyed. Chapter 10 tells of the amazing battle against the Amorites when the sun stood still for a day. It also records the conquering of the southern cities by the Israelites. Chapter 11 tells of the defeat of the northern kings. Chapter 12 lists 31 kings who were defeated by the Israelites.

A BRIEF SURVEY OF PART 2: “The Distribution of the Land” (13-24)

In chapters 13-22 we are told how the land was distributed among the tribes of Israel. Again your instructor will survey these chapters with you. Use your book of maps, p. 55, to locate the areas allotted to the various tribes. You should be able to place the tribes in their proper location on a map. Chapters 23-24 record Joshua’s farewell address to Israel’s leaders, the renewal of the covenant at Shechem, and the death of Joshua at the age of 110 years.

MEMORABLE EVENTS IN JOSHUA:

Crossing the Jordan  Joshua 3 
The fall of Jericho – Joshua 6
The sun stands still – Joshua 10
List of defeated kings – Joshua 12

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Deuteronomy

DEUTERONOMY

GENERAL FACTS DEUTERONOMY

The name “Deuteronomy” comes from the Greek and means literally “second law.” We should not think of Deuteronomy, however, as a book of new laws given to Israel. It is instead a repetition of the law given by God through Moses. Rather than “second law,” a better name would be a “second giving of the law.” At the end of the Book of Numbers, the Children of Israel were in sight of the Land of Canaan in the Plains of Moab. The forty years of wandering in the wilderness were at an end. Moses knew that his era in the history of God’s chosen people was also coming to an end. He knew that he would not be allowed to enter the Land of Canaan. In the Book of Deuteronomy Moses speaks to the Children of Israel as an old grandfather might speak to his beloved family. He reminds them of their history and God’s faithfulness in all of their history. He repeats to them the Law that God had given to them. He admonishes them to faithfully keep God’s Law. At the end of Deuteronomy the last acts and death of Moses are recorded, perhaps by another human author.

GENERAL OUTLINE OF DEUTERONOMY

Deuteronomy can logically be divided into four main parts:

  1. Moses’ First Oration (1-4)
  2. His Second Oration (5-26)
  3. His Third Oration (27-30)
  4. Moses’ Last Acts and Death (31-34)

PART 1 – MOSES’ FIRST ORATION (1-4)

In these chapters Moses first reviews the past 38 years of history of the Children of Israel, that is their history from the leaving of Mount Sinai until they reached Moab. He tells again of the sending out of the 12 spies, the people’s rebellion, the wanderings in the desert, the defeat of certain enemy kings, and the division of the conquered lands. The end of chapter 3 tells of Moses being forbidden to enter Canaan and his view of the land from a mountain top. In chapter 4 Moses earnestly commands the Children of Israel to obedience to the Lord God. Remember that there was by now a young generation of Israelites who had not personally experienced all of the things of which Moses spoke. They needed this review and encouragement. Remember also that even the people who had experienced God’s care in the past were quick to forget. They also needed this review of their history and the encouragement to remain faithful.

PART 2 – MOSES’ SECOND ORATION (5-26)

In these chapters Moses repeats the Law for Israel. The three kinds of law are repeated: the moral, ceremonial, and civil laws. Skim over these chapters in your Bible to survey the content.

PART 3 – MOSES’ THIRD ORATION (27-30)

In these four chapters Moses urgently pleads with the people and encourages them to be faithful in keeping the Law. The blessings of obedience are enumerated as well as the curses for disobedience. Moses confronts the people with a clear choice: life or death, blessings or curses. Survey these four chapters in your Bible.

PART 4 – MOSES’ LAST ACTS AND DEATH (31-34)

Chapter 31 tells of the appointment of Joshua to succeed Moses. Chapter 32 is a song that Moses composed. His song tells of the faithfulness of God, the Rock, and of the corruption of His people. In spite of their evil, the song says that faithful God still cared for His covenant people. In chapter 33 Moses blesses the tribes of Israel. Chapter 34 records the death of the 120-year-old Moses after he had been able to view Canaan from the top of Mount Nebo. When he died, “his eyes were not weak nor his strength gone” (v.7). He died because God called him. His role in the history of God’s chosen people was fulfilled. Joshua became the new leader.

MESSIANIC PROPHECY IN DEUTERONOMY

Deuteronomy 18:15 records an important prophecy of Christ. Moses is speaking in this passage and says: “The Lord your God will raise up for you a prophet like me from among your own brothers. You must listen to him” (18:15). Memorize this great prophecy.

JESUS’ USE OF DEUTERONOMY

Jesus quoted from the Book of Deuteronomy frequently. When Jesus was being tempted by the devil in Matthew 4, three times he responded to the temptations with quotations from Deuteronomy. You will find his answers to the devil in Deuteronomy 8:3, Deuteronomy 6:16, and Deuteronomy 6:13. In Matthew 22:37 Jesus summarizes the First Table of the Law by quoting Deuteronomy 6:5. There are many other instances of Jesus quoting from Deuteronomy. The fact that Jesus frequently made reference to Deuteronomy shows the great importance of this book.

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Many people have many different ideas. Just a good man who lived and died? A charismatic man whose followers stretched the truth? A holy man with some connection to the divine? A prophet like Mohammed? Who is Jesus?

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Numbers

NUMBERS

THE BOOK OF NUMBERS GENERAL FACTS

The title for the Book of Numbers comes from the “numbering” or census of Israel found in chapter 1 and chapter 26. The Jews called the book “bemidhbar,” the first significant word in the Hebrew text. “Bemidhbar” means “in the wilderness.” That name describes where the events in Numbers took place. The Israelites were wandering in the wilderness for 40 years after they left Egypt and before they entered Canaan. We could also call Numbers “the book of grumbling,” because the book tells of the frequent grumbling and complaining of the Jews as they wandered in the wilderness. The theme of the book is “The March of God’s Army Through the Wilderness.” Numbers has 36 chapters. It covers a period of time of about 38 years, the years between the encampment at Mount Sinai and the encampment before entering the land of Canaan. Since this is one of the books of the Pentateuch, Moses is the human author of Numbers. The events that he records he knew from first-hand experience.

GENERAL OUTLINE OF NUMBERS:

  1. Preparations for Leaving Sinai (1-10)
  2. The Journey from Sinai to the Plains of Moab (10-21)
  3. Events in the Plains of Moab (22-36) (Notice that the first part of chapter 10 is included in Part 1, and the second part of the chapter is included in Part 2.)

THE FIRST MAIN PART: Preparations for Leaving Sinai (1-10)

In chapter 1 we learn that Israel’s army consisted of 603,550 men over 20 years old (v.45). The numbers from each tribe are given. The special service of the tribe of Levi is recorded in chapters 3 and 4. In chapters 5-10 we read about the following: purifying the camp of Israel of the unclean, the test for an unfaithful wife, the law of the Nazarite, offerings at the dedication of the tabernacle, and other preparations for leaving Mount Sinai. The Passover is again commanded in chapter 9.

THE SECOND MAIN PART: The Journey from Sinai to the Plains of Moab (10-21)

This part actually begins at chapter 10:11 where we are told that the Israelites left the Desert of Sinai. In chapter 11 we read of the ungrateful complaining of the Israelites about the manna and their other “hardships.” For punishment for the complaining, God sent a plague. Chapter 12 tells of Miriam and Aaron opposing Moses. Chapter 13 records the sending of 12 men to explore the land of Canaan. In chapter 14 the Israelites are complaining again and rebel. Chapters 15-21 tell of the following: special offerings, the death of one who broke the sabbath, the death of three men who rebelled, water from a rock a second time, the death of Aaron, and the episode of the bronze snake. In chapter 21 we are told that the Israelites reached the Plains of Moab.

THE THIRD MAIN PART: Events in the Plains of Moab (22-36)

Again, be sure to look at the NIV headings for these chapters. They contain such things as the following: The Balak and Balam incident, the idolatry of Israel recorded in chapter 25, the second numbering in chapter 26, the commissioning of Joshua to take over the leadership from Moses, laws, the giving of the land east of the Jordan River, the stages in Israel’s journey, and instructions for taking and distributing the land of Canaan.

THE CHAPTER NUMBER FOR THESE KEY THINGS RECORDED IN NUMBERS:

KEY VERSES FROM NUMBERS:

(The Aaronic Blessing:) “The Lord bless you and keep you; the Lord make his face shine upon you and be gracious to you; the Lord turn his face toward you and give you peace” (6:24-26).

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Leviticus

LEVITICUS

THE NAME OF THE BOOK

The third book of the Old Testament is called Leviticus in our English Bibles. The name is derived from Levi, one of the twelve sons of Jacob. The descendants of Levi were the priests and leaders of the worship life among the Children of Israel. The book tells very much about the duties of the Levites, the descendants of Levi. Therefore, the book has been called “Leviticus,” that is, the book relating to the work of the Levites. However, the book is not for the Levites alone. God intended all of His Old Testament people to know and keep His law. Very often in the book Moses is told to speak the laws in Leviticus to all the people of Israel, not just to the Levites.

A BOOK OF OLD TESTAMENT LAWS

In the last lesson we learned about the three different kinds of laws that God gave to the Old Testament Jews, the Moral Law, the Ceremonial Law, and the Civil Law. The Book of Leviticus contains primarily Ceremonial Law, the laws regulating the worship life of the Jews. In Leviticus we read very much about such things as the various kinds of sacrifices that had to be made and about the various feasts and festivals that had to be observed. We know that these Old Testament Ceremonial laws found in Leviticus were intended only for the Old Testament Jews. We might wonder why we should bother to learn about them today if they no longer apply to us New Testament Christians. Why study about them today? Because by studying them we can learn God’s attitude toward sin; we can learn that sin must be paid for if we are to be at peace with God; we can learn that the sacrifices in Leviticus pointed forward to the Great Sacrifice of Christ which freed us from our sin. By studying the Book of Leviticus, we can also understand much better parts of the New Testament, especially the Book of Hebrews. The Book of Hebrews refers very often to things mentioned in Leviticus. We would have trouble understanding Hebrews if we did not know something about what Leviticus teaches.

THE MAIN DIVISIONS

The Book of Leviticus can be divided into three main divisions:

  1. Laws on Sacrifices and the Priesthood (1-10)
  2. Laws on Purification (11-16)
  3. Holiness Laws (17-27)

THE FIRST MAIN DIVISION

Chapters 1-10 of Leviticus record LAWS ON SACRIFICES AND THE PRIESTHOOD. In these chapters you can read about five types of offerings and how the priesthood was regulated. (Read at least the headings in your NIV Bible for these chapters and survey the content of the chapters.)

THE SECOND MAIN DIVISION

Chapters 11-16 record LAWS ON PURIFICATION. By looking at the NIV headings you can see that these chapters speak about which foods were clean and unclean for the Jews. They speak also of purification after childbirth, regulations and cleansing for skin diseases, and the annual purification at the Day of Atonement.

THE THIRD MAIN DIVISION

Chapters 17-27 record various HOLINESS LAWS. Again look at the NIV headings and you will see that these chapters give laws recording such things as sexual relations, the lives of priests, and the various holy days and festivals. The punishments for disobedience to these laws are also recorded.

IMPORTANT VERSE FROM LEVITICUS:

Lev. 19:2 “Be holy because I, the Lord your God, am holy.”

THE NUMBER OF THE CHAPTER FOR THESE KEY THINGS IN LEVITICUS:

  • The various kinds of offerings 1-7
  • Clean and unclean food 11
  • The Day of Atonement 16

THE SACRIFICES COMMANDED IN LEVITICUS

It is in chapters 1-7 that God commands the various kinds of sacrifices that were to be offered.There are five general kinds of sacrifices that are mentioned. In each of the five kinds of sacrifices the basic idea is propitiation (satisfactory payment) for sins against God. The five kinds of sacrifices are:

  1. The Burnt Offering (see 1:1-17 and 6:8-13) This is the only sacrifice in which the whole animal was burnt. Cattle, sheep, goats, or doves could be sacrificed. The animal had to be a male without defect. This sacrifice expressed devotion or dedication to God.
  2. The Grain Offering (also called Meal Offering) (see 2:1-16 and 6:14-23) The grain offering was an unbloody sacrifice of grain, flour, or cakes. Part of it was burnt and part of it was to be eaten by the priests.
  3. The Fellowship Offering (also called Peace Offering) (see 3:1-17 and 7:11-21) An animal from the herd or the flock could be offered. It could be male or female. Part of it was burnt and part was eaten by the priests and offerers. This sacrifice expressed fellowship or peaceful communion with God.
  4. The Sin Offering (see 4:1 – 5:13 and 6:24-30) The following could be offered: bull, goat, sheep, dove or flour. This sacrifice was made on special occasions such as the Day of Atonement. Part of the animals were burnt and part eaten by the priests. The Sin Offering signified a restoring of the covenant relationship with God.
  5. The Guilt Offering (also called Trespass Offering) (see 5:14 – 6:7 and 7:1-10) A ram was sacrificed. Part was burnt and part eaten by priests. This sacrifice was offered for specific sins.

OLD TESTAMENT SACRIFICES AND HEATHEN SACRIFICES

Sacrificing was almost a universal practice among ancient people. The sacrifices of Israel do have some similarities with those of their heathen neighbors. But it is important to remember that Israel’s sacrifices were different in some important ways. They are different because:

  1. The one true God commanded through Moses the sacrifices of the Old Testament. The heathens sacrificed to many false gods.
  2. The sacrifices of Israel emphasize morality, that is, holy living. They emphasize the need for repentance and atonement when sin is present.
  3. There is no magic, sorcery, or superstition present in the sacrificial system of Israel. These things were present among the heathen sacrifices.
  4. The sacrifices of Israel were reverent and worshipful in tone. Heathen sacrifices often were associated with practices such as prostitution, orgies, and fertility rites. They often had a tone of frenzy.
  5. While the heathens sometimes practiced human sacrifice, the sacrifices of Israel were of animals and non-living things.

THE JEWISH FESTIVALS

Chapters 16 and 23-24 tell of the various Jewish festivals commanded by God. The following is a brief review and description of the festivals:

  • THE SABBATH (see 23:3) Sabbath is a Hebrew word that means “rest.” The seventh day of every week was to be a day of rest.
  • THE PASSOVER (see 24:5)The annual Passover was to remind the Children of Israel of how God had delivered them from slavery in Egypt. It was celebrated on the 14th of Nisan (the first month of the Jewish calendar, corresponding to our last part of March and first part of April).
  • THE FEAST OF UNLEAVENED BREAD (see 23:6-8)This feast began on the day after Passover and continued for seven days. The Jews ate bread without yeast (leaven) during this time. It too reminded them of their deliverance from Egypt.
  • THE FEAST OF FIRSTFRUITS (see 23:9-22)Other names for this feast are Feast of Weeks, Feast of Harvests, or Pentecost. It was celebrated 50 days after Passover, therefore the Pentecost, which means “50th day.” On this day the first-fruits of the harvest were offered to the Lord.
  • FEAST OF TRUMPETS (see 23:23-25)This was celebrated on the first day of the seventh month (Tishri, our September or October). It was the Jewish New Year festival, since this day began the civil new year. From morning to evening horns and trumpets were blown. It was a day of rest.
  • DAY OF ATONEMENT (see chapters 16 and 23:26-32)It was observed on the 10th of Tishri. This was the holiest day on the Jewish calendar. It was a day of repentance. Only on this day did the priest enter the Most Holy Place. Sacrifices and the ritual of the “scapegoat” were a part of this great day.
  • FEAST OF TABERNACLES (23:33-44)The feast began on the 15th of Tishri and lasted for seven days. During this time the Jews lived in tabernacles (or tents) to remind themselves of how their forefathers wandered in the wilderness and lived in tents.
  • THE SABBATICAL YEAR (25:1-7) Sabbatical year means “rest year.” Every seventh year the land was to be put to rest; no planting could be done. Whatever the land produced by itself would serve as food.
  • THE YEAR OF JUBILEE (see 25:8-55)Every 50th year was to be a Year of Jubilee. During this year the land rested, every Jewish servant was restored to liberty, and all land that had been sold went back to its original owner.

NAMES AND WORDS TO REMEMBER

  • atonement – “at-one-ment,” reconciliation, the bringing together of two who have been enemies into a relationship of peace and friendship
  • propitiation – satisfactory payment for sins
  • covenant – binding agreement between two parties
  • sacrifice – something offered by man to God
  • moral – having to do with right and wrong behavior
  • civil – having to do with government
  • sabbath – Hebrew word for “rest”
  • Nisan – the first month of the Jewish calendar, corresponds to the last part of March and first part of April
  • leaven – yeast
  • unleavened bread – bread made without yeast, bread that has not “risen”
  • Pentecost – “50th day” (after Passover), same as feast of firstfruits
  • Tishri – the seventh month of the Jewish calendar, corresponds to the last part of our September and first part of October
  • Sabbatical Year – year of rest for the land
  • tabernacle – tent
  • scapegoat – the goat that “carried” the sins of the people on Day of Atonement

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WHO IS JESUS?

Many people have many different ideas. Just a good man who lived and died? A charismatic man whose followers stretched the truth? A holy man with some connection to the divine? A prophet like Mohammed? Who is Jesus?

WORSHIP

Ever have a question about worship practices but didn’t know whom to ask? Well here’s the place for you! Learn the meaning of the Scripture readings in church,. Learn how to pray. And understand religious terms used in the church setting.

Genesis

GENESIS

GENESIS, THE BOOK OF BEGINNINGS

The name “Genesis” comes from the Greek and means “beginning,” “origin,” or “source.” The name was used in the Septuagint, the Greek translation of the Old Testament. The Jews called the book “B’reshith.” “B’reshith” is the first word of the Book of Genesis in the Hebrew language. It means “in the beginning” The Jews commonly named the books of the Old Testament after the first word or words of the books.

GOD’S BOOK OF BEGINNINGS

Genesis is a good name for the book because it is not only the book with which the Bible begins; it also tells us of many beginnings. Genesis records nine beginnings in its 50 chapters:

  1. The beginning of the earth (1:1-2:3)
  2. The beginning of the human race (2:4-25)
  3. The beginning of sin (3:1-7)
  4. The beginning of the Gospel promises (3:15)
  5. The beginning of the human family (4:1-15)
  6. The beginning of godless civilization (4:16-9:29)
  7. The beginning of nations (10:1-32)
  8. The beginning of languages (11:1-9)
  9. The beginning of the Hebrew or Jewish race, God’s covenant people. (11:10-50:26)

TWO MAIN DIVISIONS

We can think of the Book of Genesis as being divided into two main parts. The first division is chapters 1-11. The second division is chapters 12-50. Chapters 1-11 give us a general history of man over some thousands of years. Chapters 12-50 give us the history of Abraham and his descendants, the people to whom God gave the great promise and with whom He established His covenant.

HIGHLIGHTING THE BIG EVENTS AND CHARACTERS OF GENESIS

  1. CREATION: (Chapters 1 and 2) It is clear from the account of creation that the origin of the world and of life was no accident. Creation is the work of the great Creator God. Everything that God made was perfect. The high point of all of God’s creating work was the making of man. Man is different from all other creatures in that he alone is made in God’s own image, and he is in charge over all the rest of creation.
  2. MAN’S FALL AND THE FIRST PROMISE: (Chapter 3) Man disobeys God by eating of the forbidden fruit after being tempted by the devil. Because of man’s sin, he deserves eternal death; all of creation is also affected by man’s sin. But God does not leave man hopeless. He promises a Savior for man soon after man’s sin. In Genesis 3:15 God is speaking to the devil and gives the words of the Protevangelium (“first Gospel”) for man. God promises: “And I will put enmity between you and the woman, and between your offspring and hers; he will crush your head and you will strike his heel.”
  3. THE FLOOD: (Chapters. 6-9) Because of man’s unbelief and wickedness, God sends a universal flood. All but Noah and his family are destroyed. God promises that He will never again send such a flood.
  4. BABEL: (Chapter 11) God confused the language of the wicked people who were building the Tower of Babel. This is the beginning of the world’s many languages.
  5. ABRAHAM: (Chaps. 12-25:10) God calls Abraham and promises him: “All peoples on earth will be blessed through you” (12:3). In these chapters are also included the accounts of Abraham and Lot, Hagar and Ishmael, the Covenant of Circumcision, Sodom and Gomorrah, the birth of Isaac, and the testing of Abraham.
  6. ISAAC: (Chapter 25:11-26)
  7. JACOB: (Chapters 27-36)
  8. JOSEPH: (Chapter 37-50)

IMPORTANT VERSES FROM GENESIS

Genesis 3:15 “And I will put enmity between you and the woman, and between your offspring and hers; he will crush your head, and you will strike his heel.”

Genesis 22:18 “And through your offspring all nations on earth will be blessed” (God’s promise to Abraham).

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WHO IS JESUS?

Many people have many different ideas. Just a good man who lived and died? A charismatic man whose followers stretched the truth? A holy man with some connection to the divine? A prophet like Mohammed? Who is Jesus?

WORSHIP

Ever have a question about worship practices but didn’t know whom to ask? Well here’s the place for you! Learn the meaning of the Scripture readings in church,. Learn how to pray. And understand religious terms used in the church setting.